The authors believe that classroom measurement has two generalized problems. First, classroom measurement can cause student dissatisfaction, under performance, and loss of interest in certain subjects. If a student is measured through standardized testing (or any other method) and is determined to be an under performer, teachers may make the mistake of treating that student as an under performer. The student may end up convinced he/she may never be good at that given subject, thus losing interest and becoming increasingly dissatisfied with it. This problem may very well degenerate into a second generalized problem, which is stress, depression, and conflict (between the student and the teacher, or between the student and his/her peers). If a student feels dissatisfied with a subject, and feels that he/she will never be good at it, this may generate stress and even depression in the student. Alienation from peers may ensue, and there might even be feelings of resentment towards teachers and peers, thus negatively affecting the classroom’s environment.

After having covered these two general problems, it becomes clear that they are similar to each other insomuch they both spring from classroom measurement. Furthermore, it becomes clear that the problem is not the measurement itself, but rather the methods used and the way in which the measurement’s results condition both teachers and students (thus fundamentally affecting the classroom’s environment and overall teaching dynamic). Teachers should not treat students differently, nor should they make students feel different simply because they fared differently on a given test. Classroom measurement is important in order to find ways of continuously improving education, but it becomes clear that the challenges it faces are significant. In order for measurement to be effective these challenges must be surmounted; this is something that depends mostly on teachers (as they are the students’ guide in the classroom). Communication is fundamental for overcoming these challenges. Teachers must make students feel that they are capable of mastering any subject, and they must contribute by enabling students do this. Each student learns differently, and so differentiated learning may be an excellent strategy in overcoming the problems associated with classroom measurement.

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